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Literature Classes Fall 2013

English 1B
Literature and Composition: An introduction to literature that emphasizes critical reading, discussion and analytic writing about works representative of fiction, poetry, drama, and literary criticism.

English 2
Introduction to the Novel: Through reading and discussion of outstanding novels students will analyze the elements of the novel form: narration, point of view, structure, plot, character, theme, style, diction, and metaphorical language.

English 4A
Beginning Creative Writing: Introductory study and writing of fiction and poetry; drama and/or creative non-fiction.

English 4B
Intermediate Creative Writing: Intermediate study and writing of fiction and poetry; drama and/or creative non-fiction.

English 4C
Advanced Creative Writing: Advanced study and writing of fiction and poetry; drama and/or creative non-fiction.

English 5
Advanced Composition and Critical Thinking:A critical reasoning and advanced composition course designed to develop critical reading, thinking, and writing skills beyond the level achieved in English 1A. The course will focus on development of logical reasoning and analytical and argumentative writing skills.

English 7
Introduction to Short Story: An introduction to the genre of the short story, including the elements of the form: narration, point of view, character, plot and metaphorical language.

English 30.1
American Literature, Pre-Colonial to 1865: Significant writers and their works from the Pre-Colonial Period to the Civil War, including both a thematic and a historical approach to literature of the period.

English 46.1
Survey of English Literature, Part 1: Reading and discussion of important works from the British Isles in the period between Beowulf and Samuel Johnson, analyzing the meaning, style, and relevance of these works, and the importance of their authors in literary history.